Swerve Pictures hand turkey logo

"“Loves Her Gun” is one of the most soothing examinations of fear you’re ever likely to see. Adopting an appealingly low-key approach to a high-stakes subject, this gently observant drama from Geoff Marslett takes its sweet time introducing the girl to the gun, but when it does, we’re all but guaranteed to care."

--Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times (chosen as a critic's pick)

 

"An essential film about women and violence" --Gayle Trotter, Think Progress

 

"Almost documentary like realism" --Michael Nordine, The Village Voice
 

 

"As both a life-in-Austin indie and a piercing social commentary, Loves Her Gun is gripping and thoroughly entertaining cinema, the sort of unnervingly real, thought-provoking movie that does the Austin film industry proud."

--Don Clinchy, Slackerwood

 

"Her own descent into violence is so unsensationalized that it comes as a shock to see where it leads, at the same time that director Geoff Marslett and his co-writer, Lauren Modery, make it feel inevitable."

--Elise Nakhnikian, Slant Magazine

 

"the film isn’t about guns; it’s about people, and Marslett seems to know them rather well. Certainly he knows how to elicit unscripted scenes of bristling realism from talented, undersung actors. But he also knows that community is where the interesting stories, and maybe the solutions, lie — a notion that both Rick Santorum and Hillary Clinton could get behind." -- Ted Scheinman, Los Angeles Review of Books

"Top 5 from SXSW Film" -- Chris Vognar, The Dallas Morning News


"Like Allie's current plight, the film has a sort of meandering feel that fits just right without making it seem like the story is going nowhere.  Her natural progression through various situations, good and bad, registers as real"

--Annette Kellerman, Ain't It Cool News

 

"Marslett has a real feeling for this place and these people; his Austin party scenes are seductive and atmospheric"

--Andrew O'Hehir, Salon
 

This romantic tragedy follows one young woman's transition from flight to fight after she is the victim of street violence; will the weapons that make her feel safe again create problems worse than ones she is escaping?